Unilever to replace some of its beauty and personal care packaging

Unilever has announced that it will eliminate the word ‘normal’ from its beauty and personal care brands’ packaging and advertising, as part of the launch of its new Positive Beauty vision and strategy.

Positive Beauty, which sets out several progressive commitments and actions for its beauty and personal care brands including Dove, Lifebuoy, TRESemmé, Simple and Sunsilk, will see new packaging that champion a new era of beauty and is sustainable for the planet.

The removal of ‘normal’ from the packaging and advertising falls under a broader commitment to ending discrimination in beauty and championing inclusion.

Unilever president of beauty and personal care Sunny Jain said, “We know that removing ‘normal’ from our products and packaging will not fix the problem alone, but it is an important step forward. It’s just one of a number of actions we are taking as part of our Positive Beauty vision, which aims not only to do less harm, but more good for both people and the planet”.

Positive Beauty is also expected to drive a transformation in how its products are designed and formulated. The company’s Australian-made bottles – Dove, TRESemmé, and Toni & Guy – are already made with 25 to 70 per cent recycled plastic and in 2020, it gave a new lease on life to over 900 tonnes of plastic – the equivalent of 200,000 yellow kerbside bins full of plastic bottles.

Unilever also said it expects to help protect and regenerate 1.5 million hectares of land, forests and oceans by 2030, which is more land than is required to grow the renewable ingredients in Unilever’s beauty and personal care products.

“Positive Beauty will also accelerate our science and technology programmes and innovation partnerships, driving the continued transformation of how our products are designed and formulated to become more people and planet positive,” the company mentioned.

“This includes developing tailored products to serve the diverse needs of people around the world, delivering real and meaningful consumer benefits, backed by cutting-edge science. Innovation will also advance the use of more natural, biodegradable, and regenerative ingredients – alongside continued packaging innovations that use less, better or no plastic.”

Positive Beauty, which sets out several progressive commitments and actions for its beauty and personal care brands including Dove, Lifebuoy, TRESemmé, Simple and Sunsilk, will see new packaging that champion a new era of beauty and is sustainable for the planet.

The removal of ‘normal’ from the packaging and advertising falls under a broader commitment to ending discrimination in beauty and championing inclusion.

Unilever president of beauty and personal care Sunny Jain said, “We know that removing ‘normal’ from our products and packaging will not fix the problem alone, but it is an important step forward. It’s just one of a number of actions we are taking as part of our Positive Beauty vision, which aims not only to do less harm, but more good for both people and the planet”.

Positive Beauty is also expected to drive a transformation in how its products are designed and formulated. The company’s Australian-made bottles – Dove, TRESemmé, and Toni & Guy – are already made with 25 to 70 per cent recycled plastic and in 2020, it gave a new lease on life to over 900 tonnes of plastic – the equivalent of 200,000 yellow kerbside bins full of plastic bottles.

Unilever also said it expects to help protect and regenerate 1.5 million hectares of land, forests and oceans by 2030, which is more land than is required to grow the renewable ingredients in Unilever’s beauty and personal care products.

“Positive Beauty will also accelerate our science and technology programmes and innovation partnerships, driving the continued transformation of how our products are designed and formulated to become more people and planet positive,” the company mentioned.

“This includes developing tailored products to serve the diverse needs of people around the world, delivering real and meaningful consumer benefits, backed by cutting-edge science. Innovation will also advance the use of more natural, biodegradable, and regenerative ingredients – alongside continued packaging innovations that use less, better or no plastic.”

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